US Navy Teaches Streamers How to Answer War Crimes Questions

US Navy Teaches Streamers How to Answer War Crimes Questions

The saga of the US military’s attempts to recruit youth through streamers continues. Last summer, the Army and Navy Twitch channels were flooded with reports of America’s war crimes, which almost always resulted in a ban. However, as the bans began to attack free speech, the Navy asked its streamers to use different tactics when viewers raised questions about the past horrors of the American military-industrial complex. And its essence boils down to the fact that streamers treat the audience as if they were stupid, naive children.

In a streamer’s guide that journalist Mika Lovinger got his hands on, the US Navy describes how streamers should respond to questions about the US military, specifically “What’s your favorite US war crime?” Even taking into account the fact that no one expected revelations and deep conversations from the “rogues” in front of the cameras, the blanks look just pathetic.

One potential answer:

I’m here to have fun with people who also love games. If you want to know more about my life in the navy, then I will be happy to tell you about it. But I will not speak on behalf of others.

All this only proves once again how much the military is trying to use friendly images for a decision that a person must make with an understanding of the whole situation, taking into account all the dangers and consequences. Moreover, some things can haunt young warriors to the end of their days.

Another possible answer:

If you are concerned about the courses or actions of the fleet, then you should contact the representatives in your state.

Well, the classic “I just follow orders”:

I’m just here to play games. I have no interest in taking part in personal attacks.

In addition, the Military Streamer Guide states that the opinions expressed are those of the streamers themselves and do not reflect the fleet as a whole. For instance:

I understand that some may oppose the military and are not interested in a career in the navy. But for those who are interested or want to learn about the service, let’s talk.

Sadly, it doesn’t look like the military is going to leave their recruiting practices anytime soon. The military industrial complex needs fresh blood and continues the glorious tradition of using popular culture to shape a positive image .

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